DON’T LISTEN TO LAZY WRITERS!

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Unfortunately there are some authors who are lazy and really don’t care anymore. They will say things like: “I never describe my characters. I leave that for the imagination of my reader.” OR “I never describe my environment because I want the reader to picture the story anywhere in the world.”

The above is what I like to call a big unhealthy load of lazy writing. Don’t listen to these people. They are obviously dead inside. You can call them out on it and say, you don’t describe these things because you can’t picture it.

The market of Independent authors is full of people who just don’t even want to try, which makes it harder for the rest of us. I urge you to imagine your characters and locations.

I don’t know what your method is when you write but My story unfolds in my mind like a movie. I see very vivid scenes and people who are alive and struggling in the world. You should feel like these characters are important to you. These places have to mean something to these people you are breathing life into. They live in that world, give them somewhere to exist.

These lazy writers will tell you to only use “he said, she said,” as dialog tags. That is incredibly boring. I don’t care for those kind of books. That tells me that the author couldn’t be bothered to imagine their characters actually speaking or what their mannerisms would be. What a snore-fest.

They will tag all these stupid rules onto your art with no purpose other than to draw a line in the sand. Your words are a warhead, blow up their sand into oblivion, having the whole beach rain down over their lazy heads in white hot sandy grains and jagged shards of fire forged glass.

When I am creating a character, I will often type in a description and download a picture of a stranger from the internet. I will look at their face and decide what kind of person they are. Then, I will look at cities, pictures of towns, bus stations, busy streets, and create their environment. You need the steam rising from the manholes. The grey sky smothered in gathering clouds. You need the faceless strangers, heads down, pushing through the traffic, just trying to get to work. It’s our world, don’t let lazy writers take it away from you.

Indie Author War

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Being an indie author is a lot of hard work. We are in a war against posers, scam artists, and publishing companies who want us to fail. Between all the haters bashing us all over the internet and the publishers afraid they are becoming obsolete, things tend to look bleak. The only thing you can do as an author is write, right?

Wrong!

As an indie author, you are expected to create the absolutely best work you can for very little money (if any at all.) If someone can sift through the scams and garbage that has littered our beloved internet to find your masterpiece, which you have priced insanely low so someone will read it, they may be skeptical to purchase your book.

How can you get them to buy your ebook? Good question. First off, many great authors are not graphic artists, often their covers suck. If you cant make an enticing cover, you need to have $50 to give to an artist. There are so many ebook cover artists out there. Some are good and some are just expensive. What can you do? You need amazing cover art.

They say, never judge a book by its cover. REALITY CHECK! People do, it’s how we make decisions. In the stores, we look at the cover, then we read the back. If it seems interesting enough, we may open it up and read a few pages to get a taste of the author’s voice, if it still held our attention, we buy the book.

Online, they see your cover first. Some sites allow you to write a description of your book. If they are still awake by the time they finished reading your blurb, they scroll down and read what other people say about it. If there are no reviews, it’s slim that they will buy your ebook.

Trying to get someone to leave a blurb is often like pulling teeth. I often get emails from people telling me how much they love my work. I ask for a blurb but not many people write one. Why is it that people are afraid to leave comments? I see it all the time. Please leave a blurb, tell your favorite author that you like their work where it can help them.

As indie author’s we have to do all the networking, all the marketing and advertising. If you tell anyone about your book in a convo, it is dissected by your reader, searching and prying for those self selling monsters. The worst thing is to be labeled as a spammer. There are so many scam artists out there ruining the names of indie authors one must wonder if they’re hired by scared publishing companies.

I personally have no problems with the publishing companies. I’m not looking to be a publisher. They do some very hard work and they have whole teams of people to put out one book. We have to take the weight of the world on our shoulders and do all that work ourselves.

It is a huge learning curve and a mistake can cost you months or even years of hard work. If your work is edited to perfection, your story is incredible, your cover is beautiful and gleaming, people may still not buy your ebook. Why? Another good question. Marketing your book will eat up a lot of your time, figuring out what is spamming and what is advertising is a shaky bridge that is hard to cross. There are no real rules to this business yet. You will buy many books that will argue that there are, some will be good and others will be $12 of pure filler that leaves you no better off than when you started.

The only thing I can give you is this: Be a sponge, soak up every bit of information you can get, good and bad. File it in your brain until you forget your name. Never quit because you will regret it. Write three times, edit six.

Good luck

Write it once, edit it forever!

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Being a self publisher is a lot of hard work. You have to pay for everything yourself. If there is a single mistake in your creation, it is all your fault. In the end game, there is no one to blame. You have to own it. You have to edit it.

That being said, creating the book is the part most people pull their hair out at. I love that part, sometimes I can’t sleep for days. Every moment is spent thinking about the next scene and note jotting, plans of how I can slip in secret messages for the crafty reader.

The most horrid and vile part of this business is finding out you missed something. There it is, up on amazon, or where ever you publish. Your cover looks great. You have a published author who wrote your prologue as a favor. It has so much promise. It’s shining like a star on the world wide web. You decide to give it a read, and oh the horror. There on the first page, you have a lower case letter after a period. How did that little sucker get in there?

It happens to the best of us. I can’t tell you how many books I’ve read loaded with mistakes, even large publishing companies have some slip through the cracks. It is the stuff that keep us up at night. My god, we are all just a bunch of souls trying to find relevance.

So we found that mistake, what do we do with it? For an ebook writer, that’s easy. We edit the original document. What does that entail? Simple, we read that whole manuscript from the title page to the last line in the document. Biting our nails and swearing like sailors the entire time. Some of us who have a little bit more money may take this time to think about buying a new computer. If your files are safely tucked away on a usb stick, feel free to pull out your club, and or katana blade and destroy your computer. It’s always great to upgrade!

We read each line like it is the only thing in existence, researching our grammar and punctuation, just incase. Rewriting the lines we thought that were extinguished from mediocrity. Besides, we want every word to shine like a sparkling jewel, don’t we? I like to add descriptive lines I call ‘poetry’ to my action.

So we have exterminated the evil black marks in our book other people call MISTAKES, what next? Here comes the great part. Go into the settings of your bookshelf. Re upload just the manuscript over the other one. You’re done, the terrible goblins are dead, we have liftoff, you’re cooking with gas. All this awful darkness is behind you.

What have we learned? EDIT, EDIT, EDIT! Will it ever happen again? If you are a bit of a loner like I am and you don’t really have much in the ways of a good reading group, the chances point to YES. Don’t lose sleep over it. Just do what we do in life. Fix your problem and move forward.

Thank you,

Ivan Desabrais.

Authors, The Ritualistic Creature

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What complicated creatures we are. Most don’t even know it, but we practice rituals every day. Each person is different but they carry their little ticks and oddities with them where ever they are. Some rise early, have to have that tea, coffee, etc… Maybe you have to have your theme music playing. Often, and especially when I’m stuck in a story, I will listen to music, any kind really. Some kind of sound that speaks to me and says, ‘Ivan, this is the scene, quick, write it down before it’s gone.’ That’s how it feels doesn’t it? We are like photographers trying to catch a moment before it slips a way.

Some of us need to be around people, we get in our cars, on the bus, or walk to where ever it may be. We plant ourselves near them, the norms, the ones who are out there struggling, living their surreal lives. They are fighting to climb the corporate ladder, or maybe driving a cab. We gotta watch them.

Our friend the notebook in hand, coffee close by. We wait, capturing that moment. Maybe that beautiful woman, she’s mature, but strong, glowing with power, striding through the street and the sea of flesh parts for her because in her world, she is god. We need these people, they drive us, they are part of the ritual.

Sometimes, we can be deep. I find that a lot of people have lost that spiritual connection to their words. Our voices are power. We need to collect the mana that thrives in our cities, in our little towns, in our schools, our businesses, we need that life essence, that force that connects us all to breath into our characters and make them real.

My eyes open, sometimes it’s still dark. I roll over and take a look at the red numbers on my clock, a little blurry but they soon form. It’s four AM. What the hell am I doing up? I roll over and toss and turn until somewhere between six and seven thirty. My many little worlds on my mind. Will I work on Lasalle’s story today? Maybe Carver, the Bounty-hunting cowboy, out for revenge. Perhaps I will try my hand at something new, always so exciting.

Nice shower, a little colder than I’d like but it will wake me up. Catch up on a little news while I devour my cereal and the coffee brews. What is it about that brown nectar. I don’t drink it every day, nor do I have more than half a cup but it’s part of the ritual. I let the dog out, by the time I come in, it’s time for coffee. Two sugar, three cream, sometimes just hot and black. I take that cup down to the office, my Mac beaming back at me. Then there’s that first sip, is it good? Too sweet? Bitter? No, perfect.

It’s a proven fact that it doesn’t really do much to keep us awake, some can sleep right after having a cup. It’s that smell, that texture, that sinful little desert in a cup. It does something to me, it says ‘Time for work.’

If my brain is still foggy I hit Youtube and type some keywords from my story to see what kind of music comes up, any genre, I don’t sway to one specific sound, music for me is like souls talking to each other, the artist to the listener. Sometimes I can pull an image, or a mood from the song, it sets my tone.

My word-processor comes alive and my fingers dance across the keyboard, perfect. Lasalle is a fun character to write, her power, her naive mind forging like a great Japanese sword-master. Her gun ready, her heart on her sleeve. She tries to be sly and save the world. She cares that much that she would risk all for you and me.

Our rituals prepare us to enter another state of mind, they free us from the mundane and take us into that place we need to reach to see everything. They open the third eye and magic begins to flow, our passion rises like a burning white fire up from our bellies, and we blow it like majestic dragons over our blank screen or in our tattered notebooks finding that peace, that nirvana we all search for. In those hours that hole that’s in us all is full, that empty ugly spot has light and it’s shining bright for all the world to see.

Where would we be without our rituals? We are ritualistic creatures.

Fatigue & Writer’s Remorse

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One of the worst things to fight during story building is fatigue. If you’re too tired when you’re creating your master piece, you run the risk of ‘writer’s remorse.’ You will create tons of pages, maybe some will be good and you can bet that some will not. You will find yourself writing ‘double paragraphs.’ Two paragraphs, usually one after the other, saying exactly the same thing but in different ways. You want to avoid this.

Don’t get me wrong here, I’m not saying that you won’t be able to use any of your work that you create during your foggy minded typing. What I am saying is that you won’t be able to tell if it truly is good or if it belongs in the bin, as Gordon Ramsey might say. It’s underdone, put it back in the oven.

Writer’s remorse is YOU plugging away at that amazing story and ending up with choppy scenes, unwanted characters, bad plot, flat people, no environment, maybe no reaction. REACTION drives your characters. Without it, you have flat characters. I once read a short story where a guy was stabbed and he didn’t even grunt, no cursing, no “AHHHH! You stabbed me!” Nothing. What the hell, some guy stabs you, you’re gonna make a fuss. Right?

Maybe you completely forget to mention your environment. What? Your world has no weather? No people in it except the talking heads? No obstacles? Why would you ever want to read a story like that?

Eventually, you get some rest. Bright eyed and bushy tailed, you sit at your overlord, COMPUTER and open your story, start reading what ever it was you wrote the night before to find all of the above. You’re left sitting there, staring at this mess that’s got a goofy grin staring back, mocking you, maybe the story flips you off and says, “Deal with it.”

What do you do? You suffer from writer’s remorse. Now you spend the next month, cutting, editing, rewriting, adding tons of time onto your goal. Before you know it a year slipped by and your friends and allies wont talk to you because you’ve ignored them all this time to right this horrible wrong. You could never let that story see the light of day or you would loose all face as a serious author.

To avoid all of this, get a note book. Write your whole story in it, planning it in scenes before you even type a single word. When the time comes, you write the whole thing in a couple months and call it a book. That’s life, a world you create, without writer’s remorse.

Good luck, and put you’re tray in the upright position, we’re landing here people.

For Want of an Outline

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The outline, is it important? In my opinion, hell yes. Writing an outline is beneficial when creating your novel, here’s why:

Outlining your novel is setting up main events that occur in your book. Don’t freak out, an outline is not written in the stars. You can change your mind along the way. It’s much like a fight. Your opponent the ‘Evil Lord of White Space’ and his minions have nothing better to do then challenge you at every turn. Lets fight back, an outline is like having a trainer to lead you through the match.

Before I have an outline I always know what type of story I’m writing. Since I referenced fighting in the above paragraph I will outline a story about a fighter. Now I have to decide what my main goal is. Why should I tell this story? I find too many authors share stories that are boring, make no sense, and have no reason being put to page. Just because you can write something doesn’t mean you should. I like having meaning to my work.

Back to my fighter story. First off, where do I start? How about a match?

—OUTLINE **FIGHTING FOR MY LIFE**
A story about a fighter, he is on the wrong side of life, living in darkness. He has no future, forced to work for a criminal organization. Orion can only dream of the life he wanted, he tried to get away from them after a stint in prison but that led to the deaths of those he cared for and the capture of his son.

Chapter 1 – Start with action
Orion is in the middle of a match. He’s in a construction yard, forced to fight my the criminals that have his son. They want the construction company, the crime boss believing in the old ways, appointed Orion as his champion. The construction company brought in a ringer, four time Pavement Basher champion. Orion is half his size, not even close to having his strength and he must win, he has much more to lose. The match is hard, Orion gets thrown around but something within him fights on. With a possible broken arm, Orion knocks the basher out. The criminals cheer and he is given time to see his son.

Chapter 2 – build drama and obstacles
Orion meets with his young son, possibly between 6 to 12 years old. They play some games, eat some pizza and do all the things Dax wants to do. Then Orion’s handler Mr. Harper enters, he tells Orion time’s up and he’s needed again. Orion watches as servants take his son away, crying, begging to go with him. “Please don’t leave me here dad!” Whether he knows it or not, Orion has made the decision to make the men that destroyed his life pay for what they did.

Outlining gives you the benefit of not sitting around, bashing face into keyboard, trying to figure what else to write. Now you don’t have to go chapter by chapter like I started. Having an idea of where your story is going will help you bang out those pages, and force your enemy ‘Evil Lord of White Space’ to lose ground and begin his retreat.

There’s a problem, always is. Of course you can change your outline; incorporate new plots, ideas, and twists into the story, why shouldn’t you? I mean if I wanted to add the fact Orion caused this because he took over enforcing when his father passed away, or change the timeline switch chapter 2 and make that chapter 1. Possibilities are endless.

Some authors feel writing an outline stifles their creativity. On more then one occasion I got into a zone with my battle against the ‘Evil Lord of White Space’ unfortunately when I looked back to my outline I had gone a completely different direction. I was horrified, what had I done? That’s why I have to share an outline is flexible, it’s just a map to show that your story is going somewhere

In the end, it’s not an apocalypse if you don’t follow the outline to the last word. Take a deep breath, refresh that coffee and come to terms with the fact that tweaking the outline is part of the process. Enjoy your work because if you don’t nobody else will.

Ian Desabrais

Death of Good Villains

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Ever notice how they build up this amazing villain who you love to hate, only to kill them off? What’s the point of that? Some of the best stories ever told are with villains who ‘get away to live and fight another day.’

When you do it right, your reader will not only want your villain to survive, they will begin to sympathize with them. Professor Moriarty from Sherlock Holmes is a great example of this. He is the anti-Sherlock, yet, they have a lot in common. He’s brilliant and oddly polite. Except for the fact that he’s driven to destroy, he’s just peachy. In another life, he and Sherlock may have been close friends. They kind of are, playing their little game, that’s what friends do, they play together. If you read him right, you want to feel for the guy. He reminds you of that song: ‘Behind blue eyes’ by the who. ‘No one knows what it’s like to be the bad man, to be the sad man, behind blue eyes.’

How about Dracula? Did anyone else get this is a love story? Put yourself in his shoes. He goes to war for his faith. Word comes back to his wife that he’s dead. He bathes in the blood of the enemies of the church and returns to find she has committed suicide. He drinks the ancient blood of the black cross and becomes Dracula. Much time passes. He meets a woman who is the reincarnation of his beautiful love. The whole world is trying to keep them apart and even trying to kill him. You can’t get more romantic than that. Yet, through all this, they are the ones keeping them from finally finding peace in their embrace, two wanting souls who hunger for each other. They call him the monster, they prey on his children and murder him. In this tale, you can learn to identify with the villain.

Don’t kill off your villains, and if you feel that it is absolutely necessary then for the love of everything that is sacred to you, introduce a bigger baddy that your once big bad villain was actually working for. Another great way to tackle this situation is to make someone pick up the torch to get revenge on your hero.

Every person is capable of good and evil. Some teeter to one side or the other. What if a villain became good? What the hell is the hero going to do then? Their whole life they’ve been fighting and now it just ends? No, we make someone even worst then the previous villain.

Killing off your villains without cause or just for a simple shock effect is lame. You have to do better than that. Too many writers forget to put villains in their stories. If there is no struggle, there is no story. A great writer once said: “In writing, you must kill all your darlings.” ― William Faulkner

I don’t take this to mean: ‘Kill all the characters you love.’ Maim them a little. Remember, scars build character. Make things hard for them. They need to struggle to get to where they need to be so they can grow to be great. If your heros never become great then your reader doesn’t become great. Get it? Creating great villains are an easy way to get them there.

You gotta reach, go bigger than your original idea. Always strive to be and do greater than you intended. Make us care about your villains, better yet, YOU gotta care about them. Don’t half-ass it and make some generic prick who is kind of snarky and greedy and expect me to like it. You better bring your ‘A’ game when you write your villains because you know I will. I pour my heart and soul into every character, good and bad. If I can’t feel something for each one, then what’s the point?

Ivan Desabrais

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